Ex-Voto
Brazilian Ex–Voto Heads,
Collection of Beate Echols

Miracles in the Backlands:
Aspects of Africa in Brazilian
Ex–Voto Sculpture

by Beate Echols

The vast sertão, or interior, of northeastern Brazil, is the country's least industrialized and most mysterious region. For centuries, its original indigenous population has been blended with both Europeans and descendants of African slaves. In this arid area marked by persistent poverty, religious beliefs serve to provide a refuge from hardship and to cope with adversity, be it death, disease, accidents, violence, or natural disasters. Religious cults are still of a home–made variety here. They combine elements of Catholicism with indigenous and African belief systems.

Ex-Voto
Brazilian Ex–Voto Heads,
Collection of Beate Echols

A visitor to Brazil's rural Northeast may come upon a religious sanctuary in a small provincial town or remote village to find it filled with wooden figures and body parts, and scores of sculpted heads with wide–eyed faces staring vaguely into space.

Ex-Voto
Brazilian Ex–Votos,
Collection of Beate Echols

The ex–voto or milagre, as it is called in rural Brazil, is a product of this rural Folk Catholicism, and a unique form of popular art. Haunting three–dimensional objects — heads, hands, feet, hearts and breasts, or entire human figures, farm animals and their parts, and other symbols of human life and survival, are carved from wood, or, less frequently, sculpted from clay — direct manifestations of the Catholic "miracle" as understood in this region.

Ex-Voto
Brazilian Ex–Voto Breasts,
Collection of Beate Echols

Physical proof of such a miracle (milagre) performed by a saint in response to a believer's plight, the objects represent the fulfillment of a vow (hence ex–voto) or promise (promesa) made in return for a favor granted, often in combination with a special pilgrimage. Frequently, but not always, in the form of body parts, ex–votos represent the nature of the petitioner's problem, often a physical one, as well as the fact that the favor sought was granted. It is thus not unusual for them to show physical deformities, wounds, scars, or other evidence of disease.

Ex-Voto
Brazilian Ex–Voto Hand and Leg,
Collection of Beate Echols

Brazil's sertão is dotted with pilgrimage churches or "houses of miracles" dedicated to a particular Catholic saint, or home–made folk saint, where hundreds of wooden and clay ex–votos and other votive objects are placed in bins by faithful recipients of a miracle, or are suspended from walls or ceilings. Their creators are usually self–taught artisans — men and women from the local community who may make their living as subsistence farmers or in a variety of trades. These "miracle makers" typically seek commissions from petitioners to produce a particular ex–voto object responding to a specific personal crisis. Other artisans may produce votive sculptures (heads, limbs, et cetera) "on spec" in anticipation of a patron saint's feast day or major seasonal pilgrimage which traditionally bring successful petitioners eager to make good on their vow or promise.

Ex-Voto
Brazilian Ex–Voto Body Parts,
Collection of Beate Echols

While all too often this art form has been dismissed as "primitive," the Brazilian scholar Lelia Coelho Frota rightfully observes that "although hand–sculpted ex–votos are produced by the hundreds in northeastern Brazil, they retain the vigor of deeply felt art." No two are ever alike. Some ex–voto heads and body parts are largely naturalistic and fashioned to produce a likeness to the person at the center of the divine intercession. Many are more schematized, almost abstract, yet they retain a powerful expressive quality. Many are personalized by the petitioner. They may be signed and dated and indicate the believer's place of origin. Others may be adorned with fancy ribbons, or they may feature photos, personal notes, or expressions of gratitude. Occasionally they are enhanced with colors and paint.

The precise origin and meaning of the sculpted Brazilian ex–voto is not entirely known. Scholars agree, however, that this art form combines Iberian Catholic devotional practices with an African aesthetic and, as some suggest, perhaps with an African spiritual content. Three–dimensional ex–voto has often been associated with African artistry. Ex–voto heads in particular have been variably described by Brazilian cultural historians as "cubist" sculptures and as shaped by the "African cut." Some researchers speculate that these votive objects may even have the protective properties of African charms or amulets, especially since they are believed by many Brazilians to have a magic function, in that the misfortune in question is supposed to be absorbed by the wooden object.

Ex-Voto
Brazilian Ex–Voto Figures,
Collection of Beate Echols

Whatever their exact function and meaning, which may vary somewhat by sanctuary or community, wooden and clay–sculpted ex–votos may soon be a thing of the past as they are increasingly replaced by factory–made, mass–produced replicas. While these are physically and visually banal, they still carry a personal message and retain their ritual content and symbolism. They continue to be signifiers of a profound faith in the supernatural — the milagre.




Ex-Voto
Brazilian Ex–Votos,
Collection of Beate Echols


About the author:
Beate Echols has written and lectured on art from the Americas and self–taught artists since 1995, both in New York City and elsewhere. From 1997 until 2004 she was on the teaching faculty of the Folk Art Institute at the American Folk Art Museum where she taught courses on Latin American and Latino art, cultures and traditions. She has been a lender to major museums for exhibitions of works by self–taught and visionary artists (such as the American Visionary Art Museum, El Museo del Barrio, and the San Antonio Museum of Art) and worked on a number of curatorial projects. She was the sole curator of Saints, Sinners, Sacred Spaces — Devotional Art from Latin America at the Mandeville Gallery of Union College in Schenectady, NY in 2000, and Miracles in the Backlands — Aspects of Africa in Brazilian Ex–Voto Sculpture at the Art Galleries of Ramapo College in 2005. She has written articles for Raw Vision Magazine #20 and Raw Vision #47, the Folk Art Messenger (#61), and other publications. To view her remarkable Gallery offerings of Latin American Art and more of her collection of Brazilian Ex–Votos, please visit her website, Mariposa.

"Miracles in the Backlands: Aspects of Africa in Brazilian Ex–Voto Sculpture" ©2005 by Beate Echols. This article was initially written to accompany an exhibition at Ramapo College Echols curated in 2005. This article and the photographs may not be reproduced in any form without the express and written consent of the author.